Case Guidelines

Print Friendly

Why Submit
Which Workshop?
Who May Submit?
Travel Award
Dispositions
Deadline & Case Report Revisions
HIPAA Regulations
Embargo and Copyright Policy


Why Submit

Submitting a case report to IDWeek will provide an opportunity to have your work reviewed by colleagues in the field of infectious diseases. It also provides an excellent opportunity for fellows in training to showcase their cases to a large audience at IDWeek.  Selected cases will be featured in one of two popular Fellows’ Day workshops (General or Adult ID training programs and another for Pediatric ID training programs). Those cases featured in the General or Adult ID Fellows’ Day workshop will also be posted on the Partners Infectious Disease Images website: www.idimages.org.

Back to top

Which Workshop?

Case reports submitted in a General or Adult infectious diseases training programs should be submitted for consideration in the General or Adult ID Fellows’ Day workshop.  Case reports submitted in a Pediatric infectious diseases training program should be submitted for consideration in the Pediatric Fellows’ Day workshop.

Case reports of pediatric patients submitted to general infectious diseases training programs may be submitted to both workshops.  In the event that the case is selected for both workshops, the author may claim no more than one travel award.  Submitting a case to both workshops requires that the submission steps are followed for each workshop.

Back to top

Who May Submit?

Fellows from infectious disease training programs inside and outside of the U.S. and residents from U.S. and non-U.S. programs may also submit case reports for the General Adult ID Fellows’ Day workshop.  The Pediatric Workshop will also accept case submissions from fellows, residents, and medical students. For anyone submitting a case from a non-U.S. program, please pay careful attention to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations to which all U.S. program trainees must adhere.  In order to be considered for the Fellows’ Day workshops, all authors must ensure that their cases comply with these HIPAA regulations.  See HIPAA Regulations.

Back to top

Travel Award

There is an $800 travel award given to the presenting author of cases selected for presentation at the Fellows’ Day and Pediatric Fellows’ Day workshops.  The author must claim the award in person during IDWeek by visiting the headquarters office. Checks will not be mailed to awardees.

Back to top

Dispositions

Case report disposition notices will be sent on or before Friday, July 11 via email to presenting authors only.  Case report dispositions will not be provided over the telephone.  It is the responsibility of the presenting author to notify and ensure that all co-authors are informed that the case has either been accepted or rejected, and to disseminate the presentation information.  If your case report is accepted, you will receive edits to include in your PowerPoint presentation for the workshop.  If you have not received your notification by 5 p.m. EDT on July 11, 2017, please send an email to info@idweek.org.

Back to top

Deadline & Case Report Revisions

The deadline to submit a case for either the General & Adult ID or Pediatric ID Workshops Wednesday, May 17, 2017 at 5 p.m. EDT.  Revisions of the case reports, including additions or deletions of author names, will not be permitted after the submission deadline, Wednesday, May 17, 2017 at 5 p.m. EDT.

Back to top

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Regulations

To ensure that case reports are compliant with HIPAA regulations, please read the list of 18 elements which the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and National Institutes of Health require the removal of from shared public health information.  In the statements below, the healthcare provider is considered the “covered entity.”

De-identifying Protected Health Information Under the Privacy Rule Covered entities may use or disclose health information that is de-identified without restriction under the Privacy Rule. Covered entities seeking to release this health information must determine that the information has been de-identified using either statistical verification of de-identification or by removing certain pieces of information from each record as specified in the Rule.

The Privacy Rule allows a covered entity to de-identify data by removing all 18 elements that could be used to identify the individual or the individual’s relatives, employers, or household members; these elements are enumerated in the Privacy Rule. The covered entity also must have no actual knowledge that the remaining information could be used alone or in combination with other information to identify the individual who is the subject of the information. Under this method, the identifiers that must be removed from the case and images submitted are the following:

  1. Names.
  2. All geographic subdivisions smaller than a state, including street address, city, county, precinct, ZIP Code, and their equivalent geographical codes, except for the initial three digits of a ZIP Code if, according to the current publicly available data from the Bureau of the Census: The geographic unit formed by combining all ZIP Codes with the same three initial digits contains more than 20,000 people. The initial three digits of a ZIP Code for all such geographic units containing 20,000 or fewer people are changed to 000.
  3. All elements of dates (except year) directly related to an individual, including birth date, admission date, discharge date, date of death; and all ages over 89 and all elements of dates (including year) indicative of such age, except that such ages and elements may be aggregated into a single category of age 90 or older.
  4. Telephone numbers.
  5. Facsimile numbers.
  6. Electronic mail addresses.
  7. Social security numbers.
  8. Medical record numbers.
  9. Health plan beneficiary numbers.
  10. Account numbers.
  11. Certificate/license numbers.
  12. Vehicle identifiers and serial numbers, including license plate numbers.
  13. Device identifiers and serial numbers.
  14. Web universal resource locators (URLs).
  15. Internet protocol (IP) address numbers.
  16. Biometric identifiers, including fingerprints and voiceprints.
  17. Full-face photographic images and any comparable images.
  18. Any other unique identifying number, characteristic, or code, unless otherwise permitted by the Privacy Rule for re-identification.

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health. (2 Feb. 2007). “HIPAA Privacy Rule”. Retrieved from http://privacyruleandresearch.nih.gov/pr_08.asp In addition, if an image of a physical finding is present (even if it is not identifiable), please confirm that the patient or their legal representative has signed a consent form for the image or images to be published for medical education, and that the consent form is on file.  The consent form should NOT be submitted but should be kept on file.

 Back to top

Embargo and Copyright Policy

Case reports are considered official communications of the conference. The presenting author and co-authors must comply with the IDWeek embargo policy, which states that case reports must be based on results that have not or will not have been published in any journal nationally or internationally, wholly or in part, before the IDWeek meeting. Case reports must not be submitted if previously presented at a national or international meeting such as IDSA, SHEA, ICAAC, ASM, CROI, or ECCMID. The IDWeek Program Committee will consider case reports that have been previously submitted at smaller/regional meetings, but have not been published in a journal and on the proviso that no rights have previously been transferred; however, all new or updated data must be included in the case report.

Authors and co-authors transfer any copyrights and agree to release the case report for future IDWeek publication on idimages.org and in all formats including translation, the production of audio/video record oral presentations for later sale or publication, and the right to allow third parties to carry out any of these activities.

Please note: In submitting your case report you also warrant that you have exercised reasonable care to ensure that the Article is accurate and does not contain anything which is libelous, or obscene, or infringes on anyone’s copyright, right of privacy, or other rights.

All case reports must be embargoed until Wednesday, October 4, at 12:01 a.m. PST, with the exception of research findings presented at IDWeek press conferences.

Back to top

 

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT